Posts Tagged ‘actor

04
Jun
09

In Passing… David Carradine (1936-2009)

David_Carradine

 

Actor, musician, producer, and director David Carradine was found dead in his Bangkok hotel room. His father was actor John Carradine and his half-brothers were Keith and Robert Carradine and Michael Bowen. David Carradine has been acting in television and film since 1963 when he was on “Armstrong Circle Theatre.” His first film role was as Cal Dodge in “Taggart” (1964). In 1972 he took the role of Kwai Chang Caine in the TV series “Kung Fu” (1972-1975) which is the role he’s most identified with. His other film work includes “Death Race 2000,” the “Kill Bill” movies and most recently “Crank 2.” He has worked with such directors as Roger Corman, Martin Scorsese, Ingmar Bergman, and Quentin Tarantino. Aside from acting he was a musician having recorded 60 tracks in multiple genres and sung in several films. He was 72 years of age.

It’s still early for details but as of this writing the story is that Carradine committed suicide by hanging himself in his hotel room.

Thought and prayers to his family and friends.

For more information, check out his IMDB page at:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001016/

Or visit webpage at:
http://david-carradine.com/

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05
Jan
09

In Passing… Pat Hingle (1924-2009)

redemption_hingle3

 

 

Veteran TV and film actor Pat Hingle passed away of leukemia on Saturday, Januaryb3. Hingle began his acting career with an uncredited role in “On the Waterfront” (1954). He then starred in TV series such as “Suspense,” “Studio One,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “The Twilight Zone,” “M*A*S*H,” “Magnum, PI.,” and others. During his film career he worked twice with Clint Eastwood (“Hang ‘Em High,” “Sudden Impact”) and he played the role of Gotham City’s Police Commissioner Gordon in the 1989-1997 “Batman” movies. He was 84.

 

Thoughts and prayers for his family and friends.

 

For more information, check out his IMDB page at:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0385757/

29
Sep
08

In Passing… Paul Newman (1925-2008)

 

 

Actor, director, and humanitarian Paul Newman died Friday of complications in regards top lung cancer. He was 83. Born in Cleveland, OH, and growing up, had an affinity for theater. He began studying it before going into World War II, operating as a radioman/gunner. Upon returning to the States he finished his degree at Kenyon College and would later study acting at Yale and the Actor’s Studio in New York City. He entered Broadway and did original plays which included “Sweet Bird of Youth,” which he would later be in the film version as well. His first role was as Basil in “The Silver Chalice.” He would later go on to star in such movies as “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” “Torn Curtain,” “Cool Hand Luke,” “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” “The Sting,” “Slapshot,” “The Color of Money,” and “Road to Perdition.”

 

Newman’s humanitarian efforts stem from Newman’s Own, his signature salad dressing, popcorn, lemonade, salsa, etc. which brings in $200 million a year after taxes, all of which is donated to charity. The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp is a residential summer camp for seriously ill children, which he set up. And as of 2007 he started a $10 million scholarship at Kenyon College.

 

For more information, check out his IMDB page at:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000056/

 

Thoughts and prayers go to his family and friends.

11
Aug
08

In Passing… Isaac Hayes (1942-2008)

 

 

Soundtrack composer and actor Isaac Hayes passed away on Sunday, August 10, 2008 at the age of 65. Hayes has composed and/or performed music for 65 movie and TV shows, as well as acted in 66. He’s renowned for his roles in such films as “Truck Turner,” “Escape from New York,” and as Chef in the cartoon series, “South Park.” He is also the first Black American to win an Oscar for Best Original Song for the Theme of “Shaft.”

 

For more information, click on the link:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0005002/

 

Thoughts and prayers go to his family and friends.

11
Aug
08

In Passing… Bernie Mac (1957-2008)

 

 

Comedian Bernie Mac passed away at the age of 50 on Saturday, August 9, 2008. Born Bernard Jeffrey McCollough in Chicago, he grew-up in one of the rougher neighborhoods while trying to pursue his dream of standup comedy. At the age of 19, he left to become a professional comedian. His first breakthroughs came in 1992 when he had a role in the film “Mo’ Money,” as well as “Def Comedy Jam.” Since then he has went on to be in such films as “Friday,” “Booty Call,” “Ocean’s Eleven,” “Head of State,” “Mr. 3000,” “Guess Who,” and “Transformers,” as well as having his own sitcom, “The Bernie Mac Show.”

 

For more information, click on the link:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0005170/

 

Thoughts and prayers go to his family and friends.

01
Jul
08

In Passing… Don S. Davis (1942-2008)

 

 

Actor Don S. Davis died Sunday from a heart attack while at his home. He was 65 years in age. Davis’ debut was in the TV show, “Joanie Loves Chachi.” From there he had roles in film and in TV series as “MacGuyver,” “21 Jump Street,” “Twin Peaks,” “The X-Files,” and most recently he played General George Hammond in, “Stargate SG-1.”

 

Thoughts, prayers, and best wishes to the Davis family.

 

For more information on Don S. Davis, click here:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0204493/

23
Jun
08

In Passing… George Carlin (1937-2008)

 

 

This one is kinda personal.

 

I’m not big on doing these obit columns. Part of the reason I do them, among the gambit of other entertainment news/reviews that I do, is to pay respect to individuals (quite a few who are behind the scenes) and to make aware to those outside the industry the passing of someone who affected entertainment and, at times, became part of the pop culture.

 

This morning I logged onto the Net and found George Carlin was dead. He had passed away yesterday from heart problems at the age of 71.

 

The first time I had heard about him through my parents and friends. I eventually anted-up and bought “Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics” (an audio version of his “Doin’ It Again,” HBO special). It was my rite-of-passage into the world of comedy. From that point I bought his next two albums and listened to the point where I knew the routines by heart.

 

Being a movie nerd (special interest geek) I remember back to the “Bill and Ted” movies where he played Rufus. He was in on the joke of it all and hey, it was a paycheck. He also played in some of Kevin Smith’s movies notably “Dogma” (as a priest), “Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back” (as a hitchhiker who knew the rules of the road), and in “Jersey Girl” as Ben Affleck’s dad. Other films include: “Scary Movie 3,” “Cars,” and “Car Wash.”

 

But the real reason that Carlin is known is his comedy. Social and political commentary, religion, human nature, and poking fun at the English language, were all done with acidic humor and wit. Whether he was talking about war (“The bombs and the rockets and the bullets are all shaped like dicks…”) or language (“Sneakers became running shoes. Toilet paper became bathroom tissue…”) or anything else (“A place for all my stuff…”) he knew how to jab at it the right way, making a point and having you agree at the same time.

 

One accomplishment (if you can call it that) was having a Supreme Court case brought against him. In 1973 he was in Wisconsin doing a concert rattling off the “Seven Dirty Words.” Wisconsin radio broadcasted it all (uncensored) and a guy driving down the road with his son in the car were listening to it. He complained, it went to the FCC, the FCC talked with the TV station, Carlin was brought up on obscenity charges, and eventually it went up to the Supreme Court. You can go to your local library and look it up the case; it’s funny to see the seven words listed in a book that contains other, more prestigious, cases.

 

In closing, thank you George for inspiring comedians around the world and for making the rest of us think about the things we take for granted. We’ll miss your satiric thoughts, sharp tongue, and the fact that you could make us laugh our asses off.

 

“Honesty may be the best policy, but it’s important to remember that apparently, by elimination, dishonesty is the second-best policy.” – George Carlin

 

 

For more information, check out the article on Yahoo! At:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080623/ap_on_en_tv/obit_george_carlin

 

For his movie credits, click on the link below:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0137506/