Posts Tagged ‘adaptation

08
Dec
16

#36. The Tragedy of MacBeth (1971)

the-tragedy-of-macbeth-movie-poster

Starring Jon Finch, Francesca Annis, Martin Shaw, and Terence Bayler.

Directed by Roman Polanski

The Short, Short Version:

Finch is MacBeth, the Scottish Thane of Glam who happens upon three witches who tell him that he’ll be the new Thane of Cawdor as well as the King of Scotland. Next thing he knows he IS the Thane of Cawdor as well but once King Duncan’s son Malcolm is crowned Prince MacBeth is less about redemption and more about retribution as he kills Duncan and becomes King. Following the Despot’s Guide to Complete Rule he sets to murder anyone else who may be able to claim the throne from him. One last trip to the witches gives him the prophecy, “… till Birnam forest come to Dunsinane,” which boggles and infuriates him but faster than you can say, “Ides of March,” MacBeth is overturned and beheaded.

Why This Made the 40:

In what also feels a lifetime ago it was a pick by my high school senior English teacher, Mr. Gleaves. Usually Shakespeare’s stuff feels stilted (c’mon… how many times do you use “thane,” or “thee,” or thou sayest?” without some sense of mockery?) but watching it on a 13” TV suspended from the ceiling I was transfixed. This was what Shakespeare was at its core – dark, bloody, gritty, dirty, and violent. I would later happen upon the reason for that – Polanski directed the movie following the murder of his wife, model Sharon Tate. For those of you who don’t know Polanski was in a relationship with Tate who, on a certain fateful night, became a victim of slaying by the followers of Charles Manson. Manson sent his followers to a house that was initially owned by a certain record producer who Manson wanted dead but was since sold to another person. Manson’s followers didn’t know the difference and murdered everyone there. Polanski, grief-stricken, decided to plunge himself back into his work. Playboy owner and founder Hugh Hefner, feeling sorry for the death of Tate, assisted in bankrolling/producing the movie. Polanski’s hurt, anger, pain, and rage are reflected in the film and, knowing that, gives a context to the violence on screen. I recommend this film not as a celebration of a tragedy but as a darkly personal catharsis wrapped in a Shakespearean tragedy. It’s not the grass on the ground but the dirt and worms underneath. Forget any of the Hammer film sets or anything Kenneth Branagh put out – this is the must watch.

21
Jun
10

I’m Not Lovin’ It When an Adaptation Comes Together. ‘The A-Team’

They stayed true to shit blowin’ up…

Starring Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper, Quinton ‘Rampage’ Jackson, Charlto Copley, Jessica Biel, Patrick Wilson, and Gerald McRaney. Directed by Joe Carnahan. Based on the TV series, “The A-Team.”

“In 1972 a crack commando unit was sent to prison by a military court for a crime they didn’t commit. These men promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the Los Angeles underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire the A-Team.”

So goes another piece of my childhood: “The A-Team.” Let’s set the Wayback Machine once again for the Eighties and all it encumbered. In a decade that started after the official end of the Vietnam War there came the idea of the anti-hero on television: the guy you shouldn’t root for but you do because he’s out to become the hero. It probably started with Sergio Leone’s “man with no name” trilogy (especially “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”) and continued with such fare as the “Billy Jack” series, “Walking Tall,” “First Blood,” “Death Wish,” and “Mad Max” (and its follow-up “The Road Warrior”). In these the antagonist became a victim before becoming the hero; the man whom acts out cathartic feelings of the collective.

Whatever becomes popular in film will seep into television and the anti-hero was no exception. “Knight Rider” gave us a cop (Michael Long, for the trivia inclined) who became injured in the line of duty only to return to fight crime as a lone crusader with the help of a rich benefactor, plastic surgery, and a talking car named K.I.T.T. Or there was Stringfellow Hawk (Jan Michael Vincent), a lone man hired to run a top secret helicopter called Airwolf while the powers that be tried to help him get his half-brother back. And then one of my favorites, “The Equalizer,” about a former British secret agent named Jack McCall who moves to New York City and makes it his job to help out the less fortunate to “pay” for whatever atrocities he committed in his life.

Out of this pool came “The A-Team”: a group of miscreant Vietnam War commandos operating as Robin Hood and his Merry Men of Southern California. There was Colonel Hannibal Smith (George Peppard), the grizzled, cigar-chomping “man with the plan.” Lieutenant Templeton “Face” Peck (Dirk Benedict), the ladies man and improv actor. Bosco “B.A.” Barracus (Mr. T), the brute force/muscle man of the group with a bad attitude. And finally H.M “Howling Mad” Murdock (Dwight Schultz) the weapons/inventions madman. All of them had their quirks and lest we not forget their catchphrases: Hannibal’s “I love it when a plan comes together,” and Mr. T’s “I pity the fool.” It was all big, dumb fun with two-dimensional characters (at best) and when your other choices are the Duke Boys in their Dodge Charger, Magnum cruising Hawaii in his Ferrari, or anything else I’ve mentioned, it’s all par for the course.

Got all that? There will be a quiz later.

Joe Carnahan’s adaptation of the TV series feels a half-hearted, as if the cheese was picked off of the pizza and what we are seriously having for dinner is cardboard with sauce on it. To his credit the characters felt more fleshed-out than the TV series, and the actors who play the roles get them right for the most part (props to Charlto Copley’s take on Murdock), but still… something feels missing.

The action kicks off with Hannibal, bound to a chair by two Mexican thugs who took a wad of cash off of him before letting the Doberman dogs try to rip him to pieces. The guys leave, he gets free, the dogs go after him, they run away, he lights a cigar and sneers. Yep, badass.

Meanwhile some distance away “Face” (Cooper) is in a bathrobe inside a series of rubber tires while a guy places a noose around his neck and someone else gets gasoline to set him on fire. He slept with a General’s wife, the General is getting his revenge, and he’s waiting for Hannibal to show up.

Incidentally Barracus (Jackson) is not too far away, just having gotten out of prison he goes to reclaim his van (a modified version of the TV one) and is heading into Mexico when he almost -literally- runs into Hannibal who forces him at gunpoint to help pickup Face.

Sometime later they are at a medical hospital to pick up Murdock (Copley) who pretends to be a doctor and stitches a lightning bolt on B.A.’s arm and sets Face on fire. Hannibal picks him up because he’s a qualified chopper pilot.

Fast-forward 8 years and 80 missions later. CIA Agent Lynch (Wilson) confronts Hannibal with a mission: retrieve some stolen U.S. currency plates from Iraqis who want to start their own printing press. General Morrison (McRaney) asks Hannibal not to take on the mission because it’s currently being seen to by Blackforest Ops lead by Brock Pike (Brian Bloom). Enter Charisa Sosa (Biel), the standard former-love-interest-turned-bitch to Face. She knows that by telling Face not to do the mission that he’ll do it. And they do. And things go badly.

Morrison is killed which leads to the group being dishonorably discharged and sent to various federal pens. Lynch helps Hannibal break out and he rounds up the rest of the team, from Face living a posh lifestyle (he has a tanning bed) to B.A. Finding peace within himself and adapting a way of non-violence to Murdock being Murdock at another medical hospital. The team is now out to find who killed Morrison, why they were setup, and what happened to the plates.

And that, my friends, is all the setup you need.

Overall, I wish the movie had been more fun. It’s not necessarily the “cheese factor” but it could’ve used a bit of that. Neeson is a great actor and granted the man plays most every role with a deal of conviction, but the Hannibal of the series never had that conviction or if he had it was momentary. Cooper does a good job as being Face but he’s also starting his career for the most part and there aren’t a lot of other parts to compare him to. Jackson as B.A. Barracus lacks the “dumbness” or brute mentality that Mr. T had in the series. Charlto Copley, however, nails Murdock and is a great role for him following last year’s “District 9.”

I had a lot of hopes for this movie coming from the director of “Narc,” and “Smokin’ Aces” and was let down. I wasn’t expecting Shakespeare (can anyone given the source material) but had wanted something more; something less placid and surface-level. There are general moments that are funny but for the most part its played as if everyone knows what’s going on all the time which is something that the audience should not see or know. Also there were not enough moments of things going horribly wrong -the movie and its characters keep running as if nothing just happened. We need the ups and downs in order to root for them.

WATCH FOR: Director Joe Carnahan as the liaison at the Mexican medical hospital. Also stay after the end credits to see Dwight Schultz and Dirk Benedict doing cameos.

My grade: C (re-evaluated)

Chas Andrews is a freelance writer, blogger, movie critic, what-have-you. Check out his hardboiled crime tale, The Big Adios, at http://aidencobb.blogspot.com

07
Aug
08

Movies about Making Movies

“Adaptation” (2002 ) – Charlie Kaufman (Nicolas Cage) is struggling to adapt a book called, “The Orchid Thief.” The author Susan Orlean (Meryl Streep) looks for something more in life and finds renegade botanist John Laroche (Chris Cooper). And tagging along trying to be like his twin brother is Donald Kaufman (also Nicolas Cage). Directed by Spike Jonze. Favorite moment: Brian Cox playing screenwriter Robert McKee.

 

“Baadasssss!” (2003 ) – Mario Van Peebles directed this half-documentary/ half-homage to his father’s movie, “Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song.” The movie is based on his dad’s experience with making “Sweetback,” Mario’s experiences in/around the set of the movie, and other remembrances of what happened. Also titled: “How to Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass.”

 

 

“Barton Fink” (1991 ) – Barton Fink (John Turturro) is a New York playwright summoned by Capital Pictures President Jack Lipnick to write a B-movie “wrestling picture” for Wallace Beery. His only “friend” on the West Coast is Charlie Meadows (John Goodman), his next-room neighbor at the hotel he’s staying at. As he struggles to write the B-picture the world closes in; his mentor W.P. Mayhew (John Mahoney) offers little help and police detectives want to know more about Charlie Meadows. One of my favorites from the Coen Bros. Favorite scene: the hotel hallway is on fire and Charlie Meadows is running down it, cocking his shotgun.

 

“Bowfinger” (1999 ) – Directed by Frank Oz, “Bowfinger” has Steve Martin (who also wrote) as Bobby Bowfinger, a down-and-almost-out B-movie director/producer. When his friend Afrim produces a script called “Chubby Rain,” Bowfinger sets out to get the biggest name in town to “star”: Kit Ramsey (Eddie Murphy). Attending the cast auditions are his regulars including an aspiring actress who sleeps to the top (Heather Graham) and Kit’s younger brother Jiff (also played by Eddie Murphy). Favorite moment: Bowfinger driving into Mexico to pick up his “crew” (all illegals).

 

“CQ” (2001 ) – Roman Coppolla (son of Francis and brother to Sofia) directed this film set in the late-Sixties about an American filmmaker who moves to Paris to make a sci-fi film, and maybe find his purpose in life. Starring Jeremy Davies, Angela Lindvall, Gerard Depardieu, Jason Schwartzman, and Billy Zane, it’s a fun little movie. Favorite moments: anything with agent Dragonfly.

 

 

“Get Shorty” (1995 ) – Based on the character created by Elmore Leonard, “Get Shorty” is about mobster Chili Palmer (John Travolta) who goes out to Hollywood to collect on a debt from low-budget horror producer Harry Zimm. Palmer uses his mobster skills to survive and finds that what he really wants is to be a Producer. Good movie overall. Directed by Barry Sonnenfeld.

 

 

“The Player” (1992 ) – Tim Robbins is a studio exec who receives postcards threatening his life from a screenwriter whose script he rejected. As he tries to find the screenwriter to pay him off, he delves further and further into deceit, blackmail, and murder. Full of inside jokes and cameos, this one is worth checking out. Favorite moment: Buck Henry, writer of, “The Graduate,” pitching “The Graduate 2;”something about a ménage a trios… Directed by Robert Altman.

 

“Shadow of the Vampire” (2000 ) – Historical-based movie with John Malkovich playing F.W. Marnau and Willem Dafoe playing the enigmatic “Shreck” as Marnau was directing his “Dracula”-based movie, “Nosferatu.” When crew members die or disappear, Marnau sees that Shreck has been taking more and more advantage of him. Favorite moments: Willem Dafoe as Shreck.

 

 

“State and Main” (2000 ) – When a “big” movie comes to the small town of Waterford, Vermont, all chaos ensues: an actor chases after young girls, a starlet won’t go topless, the “Old Mill” burned down in 1960, and the locals aren’t easily conned. Directed by David Mamet.

 

 

 

“The Stunt Man” (1980 ) – Steve Railsback is a fugitive who stumbles upon the set of a movie being film by Eli Cross (Peter O’Toole). Since the movie needs a new stunt man, Railsback takes the job and falls for the leading lady, Nina Franklin (Barbara Hershey). Favorite moment: at the end of the credits Peter O’Toole yells, “Sam, rewrite the opening reel! Crush the little bastard in the first act!